If we feel upset when things go wrong or something unpleasant and unexpected happens, we’re not exactly unique in this world. But if we develop the habit of holding on to these upset feelings, we may resort to drinking too much, using drugs, or overeating (using food like a drug) in a futile effort to try and feel better.

Having worked with clients and students for many years, I’ve noticed that we are often extremely skilled at deluding and torturing ourselves. How do we do it? We speak using virtuous-sounding euphemisms for what are actually harsh and fear-inducing judgments. In my opinion, that is the case with the phrase ‘high expectations.’

This question lies at the heart of the common malady of our times: disillusionment. So many of us struggle with the sense that life is a chore, that life will never “get better.” 

We want to be kind, but sometimes we hold ourselves back. Ask yourself these questions to see what you can learn about your relationship with kindness. Then try these 8 ways of making kindness a habit!

Whether it is we ourselves or someone we love who receives a diagnosis of terminal illness –– the news stops us in our tracks. In that gap, our mind stops. After that, our mind may run in different directions––fear, grief, or shock set in . . . .

If you are tired and depressed, and wondering if you can become happy, the answer is yes! The journey from a state of tiredness and depression to a state of happiness begins with having your physical health assessed by a doctor.

Meditation on impermanence and death is a profoundly helpful practice when done properly, without a “poor me” mentality. Looking directly at the impermanence and fragility of life can save us from arrogance, the numbing effects of an attitude of entitlement, and from greed, all of which depend on holding onto the notion that we are immortal and that our ”stuff” is permanent.

One humorous comment can shift an argument in an instant or help us snap out of a dark mental state. This is because the essence of humor is the unrestricted flow of our living being. So it's not surprising that sharing humor and laughter is also good for your health . . .

We often think that, if a project is important, we need to generate stress and fearful states of mind. Not so! Jack Elias offers insights based on a famous Zen teaching, to help you in dealing with stress while working on a big project.