If we feel upset when things go wrong or something unpleasant and unexpected happens, we’re not exactly unique in this world. But if we develop the habit of holding on to these upset feelings, we may resort to drinking too much, using drugs, or overeating (using food like a drug) in a futile effort to try and feel better.

Do you ever get an anxious feeling . . .  followed by a fearful thought that something must be going wrong? Then the thought that something is wrong makes you feel more intense anxiety .

My most important insights about applying mindfulness to work are grounded in an experience I had as head of the kitchen during a sesshin at Tassajara Zen Mountain Center in 1971.

Not long ago someone was asking me about my work, and I mentioned my book, Finding True Magic. The subtitle is a long one (Transpersonal Hypnosis & Hypnotherapy/NLP) so I didn’t mention it.

Through our attempts at self-improvement, it is definitely possible to create gaps in our mind-trances, and through these gaps we can experience the happiness of our innate purity. But as long as we identify these experiences of beauty and openness as the product of the mind, as the product of our own efforts, we will miss the fullest appreciation of ourselves and our lives. We really don't need self-improvement. Our happiness is assured, if we're willing to learn (and practice) true self-love and self-appreciation.